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Freeman Dyson
1923 -

British born American physicist, astronomer, professor emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study, fellow of the Royal Society, member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, honorary fellow of Trinity College, president of the the SSI (Space Studies Institute), author of Disturbing the Universe and others

Book by Freeman Dyson
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Disturbing the Universe
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The principle of maximum diversity operates both at the physical and at the mental level. It says that the laws of nature and the initial conditions are such as to make the universe as interesting as possible. As a result, life is possible but not too easy. Always when things are dull, something new turns up to challenge us and to stop us from settling into a rut. Examples of things which make life difficult are all around us: comet impacts, ice ages, weapons, plagues, nuclear fission, computers, sex, sin and death. Not all challenges can be overcome, and so we have tragedy. Maximum diversity often leads to maximum stress. In the end we survive, but only by the skin of our teeth.

from Infinite in All Directions
A good cause can become bad if we fight for it with means that are indiscriminatingly murderous. A bad cause can become good if enough people fight for it in a spirit of comradeship and self sacrifice. In the end it is how you fight, as much as why you fight, that makes your cause good or bad.

1979 - from Disturbing the Universe