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207 of 425 are Classic essays

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Acton, Lord John Emerich
The History of Freedom in Antiquity

An Address Delivered to the Members of the Bridgnorth Institute. Published in The History of Freedom (1993) by the Acton Institute. Republished with the permission of the Institute.
The History of Freedom in Christianity

An Address Delivered to the Members of the Bridgnorth Institute. Published in The History of Freedom (1993) by the Acton Institute. Republished with the permission of the Institute.
Adams, John Quincy
Orations

Two lengthy speeches, delivered to obviously-patient audiences over 150 years ago, honouring the ideas of the U.S. founding fathers and the Constitution they produced..
Aristotle
Politics - Book 1

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 2 - Parts 1 to 6

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 2 - Parts 7 to 12

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 3 - Parts 1 to 11

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 3 - Parts 12 to 19

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 4 - Parts 1 to 11

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 4 - Parts 12 to 16

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project



Politics - Book 5 - Parts 1 to 7

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 5 - Parts 8 to 12

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 6

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 7 - Parts 1 to 9

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 7 - Parts 10 to 17

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Politics - Book 8

Translated by Benjamin Jowett, the text is courtesy of the Alex Project
Bastiat, Frederic
That Which Is Seen, and That Which Is Not Seen - Part 1 of 2

That Which Is Seen, and That Which Is Not Seen - Part 2 of 2

The Law - Part 1 of 2

This translation of The Law was done by Dean Russell of The Foundation staff. His objective was an accurate rendering of Mr. Bastiat's words and ideas into twentieth century, idiomatic English.
The Law - Part 2 of 2




Burke, Edmund
Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 01 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 02 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 03 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 04 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 05 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 06 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 07 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 08 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 09 of 11

Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 10 of 11




Reflections on the Revolution in France - Part 11 of 11

Cardozo, Benjamin Nathan
The Altruist in Politics

When people feel that their ordered societies are in decay, they are attracted too readily to principles and attitudes found in socialism and communism. Delivered at Columbia University in an address during commencement ceremonies.
Carey, George W.
Majority Rule Revisited

First published in Modern Age XVI, Summer 1972, pages 226-236. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.
Chambers, Whittaker
A Letter to My Children

From the forward to Witness, Chambers' account of the Alger Hiss spy scandal, originally published in 1952 by Random House, New York, originally digitized by the Augustine Club at Columbia University.
Chesterton, Gilbert K.
Democracy and Industrialism

Originally appeared as a column in the Illustrated London News. Later republished in the collection All I Survey.
Heretics - Chapter 01 to 03

"Introductory Remarks on the Importance of Orthodoxy", "On the Negative Spirit", "On Mr. Rudyard Kipling and Making the World Small"
Heretics - Chapter 04 to 06

"Mr. Bernard Shaw", "Mr. H. G. Wells and the Giants", "Christmas and the Aesthetes"
Heretics - Chapter 07 to 11

"Omar and the Sacred Vine", "The Mildness of the Yellow Press", "The Moods of Mr. George Moore", "On Sandals and Simplicity", "Science and the Savages"
Heretics - Chapter 12 to 14

"Paganism and Mr. Lowes Dickinson", "Celts and Celtophiles", "On Certain Modern Writers and the Institution of the Family"
Heretics - Chapter 15 to 17

"On Smart Novelists and the Smart Set", "On Mr. McCabe and a Divine Frivolity", "On the Wit of Whistler"



Heretics - Chapter 18 and 19

"The Fallacy of the Young Nation", "Slum Novelists and the Slums"
Heretics - Chapter 20

"Concluding Remarks on the Importance of Orthodoxy"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 1 and 2

Preface, "Introduction in Defence of Everything Else," and "The Maniac"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 3

"The Suicide of Thought"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 4

"The Ethics of Elfland"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 5

"The Flag of the World"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 6

"The Paradoxes of Christianity"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 7

"The Eternal Revolution"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 8

"The Romance of Orthodoxy"
Orthodoxy - Chapter 9

"Authority and the Adventurer"



Utopia of Usurers

"Art and Advertisement", "Letters and the New Laureates", "Unbusinesslike Business", "The War on Holidays", "The Church of the Servile State", "Science and the Eugenists", "The Evolution of the Prison", "The Lash for Labour", "The Mask of Socialism"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 1 - Chapter 01 to 07

The Homelessness of Man: "The Medical Mistake", "Wanted: An Unpractical Man", "The New Hypocrite", "The Fear of the Past", "The Unfinished Temple", "The Enemies of Property", "The Free Family"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 1 - Chapter 08 to 11

The Homelessness of Man: "The Wildness of Domesticity", "History of Hudge and Gudge", "Oppression by Optimism", "The Homelessness of Jones"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 2 - Chapter 1 and 2

Imperialism, or the Mistake about Man: "The Charm of Jingoism", "Wisdom and the Weather"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 2 - Chapter 3 and 4

Imperialism, or the Mistake about Man: "The Common Vision", "The Insane Necessity"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 3 - Chapter 01 to 06

Feminism, or the Mistake about Woman: "The Unmilitary Suffragette", "The Universal Stick", "The Emancipation of Domesticity", "The Romance of Thrift", "The Coldness of Chloe", "The Pedant and the Savage"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 3 - Chapter 07 to 12

Feminism, or the Mistake about Woman: "The Modern Surrender of Woman", "The Brand of the Fleur-de-Lis", "Sincerity and the Gallows", "The Higher Anarchy", "The Queen and the Suffragettes", "The Modern Slave"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 4 - Chapter 01 to 09

Education, or the Mistake about the Child: "The Calvinism of To-day", "The Tribal Terror", "The Tricks of Environment", "The Truth About Education", "An Evil Cry", "Authority the Unavoidable", "The Humility of Mrs. Grundy", "The Broken Rainbow", "The Need for Narrowness"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 4 - Chapter 10 to 14

Education, or the Mistake about the Child: "The Case for the Public Schools", "The School for Hypocrites", "The Staleness of the New Schools", "The Outlawed Parent", "Folly and Female Education"
What's Wrong with the World - Part 5 and Notes

The Home of Man: "The Empire of the Insect", "The Fallacy of the Umbrella Stand", "The Dreadful Duty of Gudge", "A Last Instance", "Conclusion", plus three notes: "On Female Suffrage", "On Cleanliness in Education", "On Peasant Proprietorship"



Churchill, Sir Winston
Wartime Address to the United States Congress

Just weeks after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, Churchill travelled to the U.S. to encourage its resolve and welcome its participation in defeating the crushing forces of Germany, Japan, and Italy.
Confucius
The Analects - Part 1 of 3

Attributed to Confucius c. 500 BC, translated by Arthur Waley, (New York: Macmillan, 1938; reprinted Vintage, 1989), paperback. This edition comes with a useful introduction and commentary.
The Analects - Part 2 of 3

Attributed to Confucius c. 500 BC, translated by Arthur Waley, (New York: Macmillan, 1938; reprinted Vintage, 1989), paperback. This edition comes with a useful introduction and commentary.
The Analects - Part 3 of 3

Attributed to Confucius c. 500 BC, translated by Arthur Waley, (New York: Macmillan, 1938; reprinted Vintage, 1989), paperback. This edition comes with a useful introduction and commentary.
Coolidge, Calvin
Have Faith in Massachusetts

A speech Coolidge delivered to the Massachusetts Senate when he became its president
Inaugural Address

de Tocqueville, Alexis
Democracy in America - Book 1 - Chapter 0 (Introduction)

Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 1

North America divided into two vast regions, one inclining towards the Pole, the other towards the Equator - Valley of the Mississippi - Traces of the Revolutions of the Globe - Shore of the Atlantic Ocean where the English Colonies were founded - Difference in the appearance of North and of South America at the time of their Discovery - Forests of North America - Prairies -Wandering Tribes of Natives - Their outward appearance, manners, and language - Traces of an unknown people.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 2

Utility of knowing the origin of nations in order to understand their social condition and their laws - America the only country in which the starting-point of a great people has been clearly observable - In what respects all who emigrated to British America were similar - In what they differed - Remark applicable to all Europeans who established themselves on the shores of the New World - Colonization of Virginia - Colonization of New England - Original character of the first inhabitants of New England - Their arrival - Their first laws - Their social contract - Penal code borrowed from the Hebrew legislation - Religious fervor -Republican spirit - Intimate union of the spirit of religion with the spirit of liberty.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 3

A Social condition is commonly the result of circumstances, sometimes of laws, oftener still of these two causes united; but wherever it exists, it may justly be considered as the source of almost all the laws, the usages, and the ideas which regulate the conduct of nations; whatever it does not produce it modifies. It is therefore necessary, if we would become acquainted with the legislation and the manners of a nation, to begin by the study of its social condition.



Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 4

It predominates over the whole of society in America - Application made of this principle by the Americans even before their Revolution - Development given to it by that Revolution - Gradual and irresistible extension of the elective qualification.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 5 - Part 1

It is proposed to examine in the following chapter what is the form of government established in America on the principle of the sovereignty of the people; what are its resources, its hindrances, its advantages, and its dangers.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 5 - Part 2

Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 5 - Part 3

Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 6

The Anglo-Americans have retained the characteristics of judicial power which are common to all nations - They have, however, made it a powerful political organ - How - In what the judicial system of the Anglo-Americans differs from that of all other nations - Why the American judges have the right of declaring the laws to be unconstitutional - How they use this right -Precautions taken by the legislator to prevent its abuse.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 7

Definition of political jurisdiction - What is understood by political jurisdiction in France, in England, and in the United States - In America the political judge can only pass sentence on public officers - He more frequently passes a sentence of removal from office than a penalty - Political jurisdiction as it exists in the United States is, notwithstanding its mildness, and perhaps in consequence of that mildness, a most powerful instrument in the hands of the majority.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 8 - Part 1

I have hitherto considered each State as a separate whole, and I have explained the different springs which the people sets in motion, and the different means of action which it employs. But all the States which I have considered as independent are forced to submit, in certain cases, to the supreme authority of the Union. The time is now come for me to examine separately the supremacy with which the Union has been invested, and to cast a rapid glance over the Federal Constitution. Origin of the first Union - Its weakness - Congress appeals to the constituent authority - Interval of two years between this appeal and the promulgation of the new Constitution.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 8 - Part 2

Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 8 - Part 3

When the head of the executive power is re-eligible, it is the State which is the source of intrigue and corruption - The desire of being re-elected the chief aim of a President of the United States - Disadvantage of the system peculiar to America - The natural evil of democracy is that it subordinates all authority to the slightest desires of the majority - The re-election of the President encourages this evil.
Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 8 - Part 4

Natural weakness of the judiciary power in confederations - Legislators ought to strive as much as possible to bring private individuals, and not States, before the Federal Courts - How the Americans have succeeded in this - Direct prosecution of private individuals in the Federal Courts - Indirect prosecution of the States which violate the laws of the Union - The decrees of the Supreme Court enervate but do not destroy the provincial laws.



Democracy In America - Book 1 - Chapter 8 - Part 5

Happiness and freedom of small nations - Power of great nations - Great empires favorable to the growth of civilization - Strength often the first element of national prosperity - Aim of the Federal system to unite the twofold advantages resulting from a small and from a large territory -Advantages derived by the United States from this system - The law adapts itself to the exigencies of the population; population does not conform to the exigencies of the law - Activity, amelioration, love and enjoyment of freedom in the American communities - Public spirit of the Union the abstract of provincial patriotism - Principles and things circulate freely over the territory of the United States - The Union is happy and free as a little nation, and respected as a great empire.
Emerson, Ralph Waldo
Character

from Essays: Second Series
Politics

from Essays: Second Series
Prudence

from Essays: First Series
Self-Reliance

from Essays: First Series
Spiritual Laws

from Essays: First Series
Hamilton, Alexander
Federalist Paper No. 01

General Introduction
Federalist Paper No. 06-07

Concerning Dangers from Dissensions Between the States
Federalist Paper No. 08

The Consequences of Hostilities Between the States
Federalist Paper No. 09

The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection



Federalist Paper No. 11

The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy
Federalist Paper No. 12

The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue
Federalist Paper No. 13

Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government
Federalist Paper No. 15-17

The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union
Federalist Paper No. 18-20 (with James Madison)

The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union - Continued
Federalist Paper No. 21-22

Other Defects of the Present Confederation
Federalist Paper No. 23

The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One Proposed to the Preservation of the Union
Federalist Paper No. 24-25

The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered
Federalist Paper No. 26-28

The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in Regard to the Common Defense Considered
Federalist Paper No. 29

Concerning the Militia



Federalist Paper No. 30-34

Concerning the General Power of Taxation
Federalist Paper No. 35-36

Concerning the General Power of Taxation - Continued
Federalist Paper No. 59-61

Concerning the Power of Congress to Regulate the Election of Members
Federalist Paper No. 65

The Powers of the Senate - Continued
Federalist Paper No. 66

Objections to the Power of the Senate To Set as a Court for Impeachments Further Considered
Federalist Paper No. 67

The Executive Department
Federalist Paper No. 68

The Mode of Electing the President
Federalist Paper No. 69-72

The Real Character of the Executive
Federalist Paper No. 73

The Provision For The Support of the Executive, and the Veto Power
Federalist Paper No. 74-77

Powers of the Executive



Federalist Paper No. 78-81

The Judiciary Department
Federalist Paper No. 82-83

The Judiciary - Continued
Federalist Paper No. 84

Certain General and Miscellaneous Objections to the Constitution Considered and Answered
Federalist Paper No. 85

Concluding Remarks
Hayek, Friedrich
Economics and Knowledge

A speech delivered to the Economics Club of New York
The Intellectuals and Socialism

Friedrich Hayek won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1974, after graduating from the University of Vienna with doctorates in law and economics. Of his many works, he is best known for The Road to Serfdom, which has been translated into twelve languages. This essay first appeared in The University of Chicago Law Review, Vol. 16. No. 3, Spring 1949, and is reprinted with permission.
The Road to Serfdom (excerpts)

Excerpts from Hayek's venerable work. The full book is available from Laissez Faire Books or through links to chapters.ca or amazon.com on conservativeforum.org.
The Use of Knowledge in Society

Friedrich Hayek won the Nobel Prize for Economics in 1974, after graduating from the University of Vienna with doctorates in law and economics. Of his many works, he is best known for The Road to Serfdom, which has been translated into twelve languages. Reprinted from the American Economic Review, XXXV, No. 4; September, 1945, 519-30.
Hazlitt, Henry
The ABC of a Market Economy

Originally published in The Freeman. Available, with numerous other essays, from The Henry Hazlitt Foundation.
Henry, Patrick
Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death




Jay, John
Federalist Paper No. 02-05

Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence
Federalist Paper No. 64

The Powers of the Senate
Jefferson, Thomas
First Inaugural Address

Second Inaugural Address

Kierkegaard, Soren
The Present Age - Excerpts

A deliberation on envy and its effect of public leveling - stifling or hindering leadership and distinction. Excerpted from his essay "The Present Age".
Lincoln, Abraham
First Inaugural Address

Lombardi, Vince
The Character of Success

A speech delivered to a business group in Dayton, Ohio. It was to be his last. A week later, Lombardi was found to be suffering with terminal cancer, which took his life in September, 1970.
Madison, James
Federalist Paper No. 10

The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection - Continued
Federalist Paper No. 14

Objections to the Proposed Constitution From Extent of Territory Answered
Federalist Paper No. 18-20 (with Alexander Hamilton)

The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union - Continued



Federalist Paper No. 37-38

Concerning the Difficulties of the Convention in Devising a Proper Form of Government
Federalist Paper No. 39

The Conformity of the Plan to Republican Principles
Federalist Paper No. 40

On the Powers of the Convention to Form a Mixed Government Examined and Sustained
Federalist Paper No. 41-43

The Powers Conferred by The Constitution
Federalist Paper No. 44

Restrictions on the Authority of the Several States
Federalist Paper No. 45

The Alleged Danger From the Powers of the Union to the State Governments Considered
Federalist Paper No. 46

The Influence of the State and Federal Governments Compared
Federalist Paper No. 47

The Particular Structure of the New Government and the Distribution of Power Among Its Different Parts
Federalist Paper No. 48

These Departments Should Not Be So Far Separated as to Have No Constitutional Control Over Each Other
Federalist Paper No. 49

Method of Guarding Against the Encroachments of Any One Department of Government by Appealing to the People Through a Convention



Federalist Paper No. 50

Periodical Appeals to the People Considered
Federalist Paper No. 51

The Structure of the Government Must Furnish the Proper Checks and Balances Between the Different Departments
Federalist Paper No. 52-53

The House of Representatives
Federalist Paper No. 54

The Apportionment of Members Among the States
Federalist Paper No. 55-56

The Total Number of the House of Representatives
Federalist Paper No. 57

The Alleged Tendency of the New Plan to Elevate the Few at the Expense of the Many Considered in Connection with Representation
Federalist Paper No. 58

Objection That The Number of Members Will Not Be Augmented as the Progress of Population Demands Considered
Federalist Paper No. 62-63

The Senate
Menger, Carl
On the Origins of Money

Translated by C.A. Foley, this essay first appeared in the Economic Journal, Volume 2,(1892) p. 239-55.
Meyer, Frank Straus
Freedom, Tradition, Conservatism

First published in Modern Age IV, Fall 1960, pages 355-363. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.



Mill, John Stuart
On Liberty - Chapter 1, Introductory

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion, Part I

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion, Part II

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 2, Of the Liberty of Thought and Discussion, Part III

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 3, On Individuality, as One of the Elements of Wellbeing

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 4, Of the Limits to the Authority of Society Over the Individual

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 5, Applications, Part I

Mills' timeless essay
On Liberty - Chapter 5, Applications, Part II

Mills' timeless essay
Montesquieu, Baron de
The Spirit of the Laws - Selections 1

Selections from Book I "Of Laws in General" from the chapters "Of the Relation of Laws to Different Beings", "Of the Laws of Nature", "Of Positive Laws"
The Spirit of the Laws - Selections 2

Selections from Book III, "Of the Principles of the Three Kinds of Government," from the chapters "Of the Principle of Democracy", "Of the Principle of Aristocracy", "That Virtue is not the Principle of a Monarchical Government", "In What Manner Virtue is Supplied in a Monarchical Government", "Of the Principle of Monarchy", "That Honour is Not the Principle of Despotic Government"



More, Paul Elmer
Academic Leadership

Aristocracy

Justice

Property and Law

The New Morality

Nisbet, Robert
Conservatives and Libertarians: Uneasy Cousins

First published in Modern Age XXIV, Winter 1980, pages 2-8. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.
Oakeshott, Michael
Rationalism in Politics - Parts 1 to 3 of 5

Originally published in The Cambridge Journal, Volumne I, 1947
Rationalism in Politics - Parts 4 & 5 of 5

Originally published in The Cambridge Journal, Volumne I, 1947
Paine, Thomas
Common Sense - Part 1 of 4

Common Sense - Part 2 of 4




Common Sense - Part 3 of 4

Common Sense - Part 4 of 4

Read, Leonard E.
I, Pencil

A classic essay illustrating the importance of economic activity and free markets, and the breadth of their reach. Economist Milton Friedman said of this essay, "I know of no other piece of literature that so succinctly, persuasively, and effectively illustrates the meaning of both Adam's Smith's invisible hand -- the possibility of cooperation without coercion -- and Friedrich Hayek's emphasis on the importance of dispersed knowledge and the role of the price system in communicating information that 'will make the individuals do the desirable things without anyone having to tell them what to do.'" Originally published in The Freeman by the Foundation for Economic Education.
Reagan, Ronald Wilson
A Time for Choosing

One of the great speeches by the man who later became one of the great presidents of the United States. Reagan delivered this speech on television in 1964 in support of Barry Goldwater and his failing campaign for the presidency. It was a watershed speech for Reagan, who had only recently left the Democratic Party to join the Republicans, and had begun to resist the liberal tide which was sweeping through his home state of California and the movie business in which he worked. The speech defined the ideas and the optimism that he would bring to the White House fifteen years later to start the Reagan Revolution. It has come to be known simply as "The Speech" by Reagan's admirers.
First Inaugural Address

Second Inaugural Address

Regnery, Henry
The Age of Liberalism

First published in Modern Age XIX, Spring 1975, pages 114-126. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.
Roepke, Wilhelm
The Inherent Limitations of the Welfare State

Excerpted from A Humane Economy: The Social Framework of the Free Market, translated and with an introduction by Marianne Cowan, published by Henry Regnery Company, from the chapter entitled "Welfare State and Chronic Inflation."
Roosevelt, Theodore
Inaugural Address

The Man in the Arena: Citizenship in a Republic

An address delivered at the Sorbonne, Paris, France



The Strenuous Life

A speech delivered to the Hamilton Club, Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.
Rothbard, Murray
Freedom, Inequality, Primitivism and the Division of Labor - Part 1-3 of 4

First published in Modern Age XV, Summer 1971, pages 226-245. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.
Freedom, Inequality, Primitivism and the Division of Labor - Part 4 of 4 & Notes

First published in Modern Age XV, Summer 1971, pages 226-245. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.
Smith, Adam
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 01-04

Of the Division of Labour, Of the Principle Which Gives Occasion to the Division of Labour, That the Division of Labour is Limited by the Extent of the Market, Of the Origin and Use of Money
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 05-06

Of the Real and Nominal Price of Commodities, or of Their Price in Labour, and Their Price in Money, Of the Component Parts of the Price of Commodities
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 07

Of the Natural and Market Price of Commodities
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 08

Of the Wages of Labour
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 09

Of the Profit of Stock
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 10 - Part 1

Of Wages and Profit in the Different Employments of Labour and Stock, Part 1
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 10 - Part 2

Of Wages and Profit in the Different Employments of Labour and Stock, Part 2



Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 11 - Part 1

Of the Rent of Land, Part 1, Of the Produce of Land Which Always Affords Rent
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 11 - Part 2

Of the Rent of Land, Part 2, Of the Produce of Land Which Sometimes Does and Sometimes Does Not, Afford Rent
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 11 - Part 3

Of the Rent of Land, Part 3, Of the Variations in the Proportion Between the Respective Values of That Sort of Produce Which Always Affords Rent, and of That Which Sometimes Does and Sometimes Does Not Afford Rent
Wealth of Nations - Book 1 - Chapter 11 - Part 3 (cont'd)

Of the Rent of Land, Part 3, Of the Variations in the Proportion Between the Respective Values of That Sort of Produce Which Always Affords Rent, and of That Which Sometimes Does and Sometimes Does Not Afford Rent (continued)
Solzhenitsyn, Alexander
A World Split Apart

Commencement address delivered at Harvard University. Originally reprinted from A World Split Apart (Harper & Row Publishers, New York, 1978). Reprinted by permission from: Media House International, P.O. Box 362173, Melbourne FL 32936-2173
Spooner, Lysander
An Essay On Trial By Jury

Vices Are Not Crimes - Parts 1 to 17

A Vindication Of Moral Liberty
Vices Are Not Crimes - Parts 18 to 22

A Vindication Of Moral Liberty
Stephen, James Fitzjames
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 1

The Doctrine of Liberty in General - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 2 - Part 1

The Liberty of Thought and Discussion - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty Part 2 of this chapter



Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 2 - Part 2

The Liberty of Thought and Discussion - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty Part 1 of this chapter
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 3

On the Distinction Between the Temporal and Spiritual Power - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 4 - Part 1

The Doctrine of Liberty in Its Application to Morals - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty Part 2 of this chapter
Liberty, Equality, Fraternity - Chapter 4 - Part 2

The Doctrine of Liberty in Its Application to Morals - part of Sir Stephen's classic antithesis to John Stuart Mills' On Liberty Part 1 of this chapter
Stevenson, Robert Louis
The Day After Tomorrow

Originally published in Contemporary Review
Thoreau, Henry David
On the Duty of Civil Disobedience

von Mises, Ludwig
On Equality and Inequality

First published in Modern Age V, Spring 1961, pages 139-147. Also published in the book Modern Age: The First Twenty-Five Years, A Selection, Edited by George A. Panichas, Liberty Press, 1988. Republished with permission.