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Christina Hoff Sommers

W.H. Brady Fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, professor of philosophy at Clarke University


Click here for an essay by Christina Hoff Sommers
I thought once I pointed out errors replicated over and over again - a supposed 150,000 girls dying every year of anorexia, for instance, whereas the correct figure is closer to 100 - the gender feminists would admit they blew it. I pointed out fatal mistakes in rape research, battery research, self-esteem research. I've since come to learn that alarming statistics on victimization are the catechisms of orthodox feminism.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
The gender feminists cannot tolerate any questioning of that crucial loyal-to-the-sisterhood principle. A more individualist grass roots feminism severely threatens them.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
Victimology has replaced religion for many. To assert that American women are fortunate rather than victimized is anathema. It violates feminist holy writ.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
I often meet students incapable of making even one single confident moral judgment. And it's getting worse. ... Recently, several of my students objected to philosopher Immanuel Kant's 'principle of humanity' - the doctrine that asserts the unique dignity and worth of every human life. They told me that if they were faced with the choice between saving their pet or a human being, they would choose the former. We have been thrown back into a moral Stone Age.

Mar. 01, 1998 - from an essay in Imprimis
Aristotle laid down ... almost 2500 years ago clear guidance on how to be moral human beings. What Aristotle advocated became the default mode of moral education over the centuries. And it worked. It is only very recently that many educators began to scorn it.

Nov. 09, 1998 - from her essay "Where the Boys Are"
While it is true that we must debate controversial issues, we must not forget there exists a core of noncontroversial ethical issues that were settled a long time ago. We must make students aware that there is a standard of ethical ideals that all civilizations worthy of the name have discovered. We must encourage them to read the Bible, Aristotle's Ethics, Shakespeare's King Lear, the Koran, and the Analects of Confucius. ... Children have a right to their moral heritage.

Mar. 01, 1998 - from an essay in Imprimis
Men and women died courageously fighting the Nazis... Because brave people took risks to do what was right and necessary, Hitler was eventually defeated. Today, with the assault on objective truth, many college students find themselves unable to say why the United States was on the right side in that war. Some even doubt that America was in the right. To add insult to injury, they are not even sure that the salient events of the Second World War ever took place.

Mar. 01, 1998 - from an essay in Imprimis
We need to bring back the great books and the great ideas. We need to transmit the best of our political and cultural heritage. We need to refrain from cynical attacks against our traditions and institutions. We need to expose the folly of all the schemes for starting from zero.

Mar. 01, 1998 - from an essay in Imprimis
Teachers, professors and other social critics should be encouraged to moderate their attacks on our culture and its institutions. They should be encouraged to treat great literary works as literature and not as reactionary political tracts. In many classrooms today, students only learn to 'uncover' the allegedly racist, sexist and elitist elements in the great books.

Mar. 01, 1998 - from an essay in Imprimis