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Dinesh D'Souza
1961 -

John M. Olin Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, former policy analyst to President Ronald Reagan, author of Illiberal Education (1991, Free Press, New York) and the The End of Racism (1995, Free Press, New York)

Books by Dinesh D'Souza
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Illiberal Education: The Politics of Race & Sex on Campus
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The End of Racism: Principles for a Multiracial Society
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Publicly inconsolable about the fact that racism continues ... activists seem privately terrified that it has abated.

1995 - from The End of Racism, New York : Free Press
In the 1950s, it might have taken courage to articulate Marxist views. Today, rebellion is defined in a different way.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
Is one of today's deepest taboos the idea of moral responsibility and moral accountability? ... It now seems dangerous to suggest that it is not society but more often individuals who must shoulder the burden for their own problems.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
I think perhaps people in the universities have externalized the idea of vice and virtue. Instead of seeing vice and virtue as personal categories to be used by individuals to guide their own actions, vice and virtue have become exclusively political concepts. A bad person is someone who offends prevailing sensibilities.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
It's ... interesting to note that the women's studies and black studies departments, which were originally set up to fight the intolerance of traditional academic departments, are now among the most intolerant places on campus.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
... the liberal's operating impulse seems to begin with indignation, a sense of passion, a sense of outrage. A lot of sentences begin, "I' m shocked and appalled." Whereas the conservative's operating impulse seems to be cynicism, kind of a chuckle or a horse laugh.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
... the conservative view of the world, because it expects less of human nature, is less indignant, and thus less susceptible to the kind of manic enforcement of taboos that we are beginning to see in American intellectual life and on campus. If you think that human nature is perfectible, you are much more upset if you see deviation.

Jan. 1995 - from "Forbidden Thoughts", a discussion published in American Enterprise by the American Enterprise Institute
When they discover resentment among students over preferential treatment and minority separatism, university administrators conclude that they have discovered the latent bigotry for which they have been searching. Consequently, many universities institute 'sensitivity' training programs ... to cure white students of their prejudice. As at Michigan, the University of Connecticut, Stanford, and Emory, some schools go so far as to outlaw racially or sexually 'stigmatizing' remarks - even 'misdirected laughter' and 'exclusion from conversation' - which are said to make learning for minorities impossible. On virtually every campus, there is a de facto taboo against a free discussion of affirmative action or minority self-segregation, and efforts to open such a discussion are considered presumptively racist. Thus measures taken to enhance diversity have instead created a new regime of intellectual conformity.

1991 - from Illiberal Education, New York : Free Press
Does contemporary liberalism have a future? No. Many white liberals are so embarrassed by low levels of academic performance and high levels of criminal and antisocial behavior by blacks that they are destroying [classically] liberal institutions such as free speech, race neutrality, the legal presumption of innocence, and equal rights under the law in order to compel equal results for racial groups.

1995 - from The End of Racism, New York : Free Press
... our current paradigm, our current way of thinking about race, our current policies to deal with it, have made important gains, but are now at a dead end.

Oct. 05, 1995 - from a speech to the Independent Policy Forum
Proportional representation for ethnic groups directly violates the democratic principle of equal opportunity for individuals, and the underlying concept of group justice is hostile both to individual equality and to excellence.

1991 - from Illiberal Education